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Important Stuff => Help Guides => Guide Submissions => Topic started by: Olimar12345 on January 04, 2019, 07:48:04 AM

Title: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Olimar12345 on January 04, 2019, 07:48:04 AM
(Hope I'm doing this right. Moving this from here (https://www.ninsheetmusic.org/forum/index.php?topic=7606.msg315542#msg315542). I've also edited it and added to it.)

"Articulations" are appropriately named. To articulate something is to add clarity or to make something clear. These markings, found above or below a written note, specify how to play a specific note or passage. Articulations tell us three things: 1) How to start the note. 2) The weight of the note. 3) (sometimes) How to end the note.

With this said, articulations have NOTHING to do with note lengths or dynamics. For example, a quarter note will last twice as long as an eighth note. A quarter note with the staccato marking does not equal an eighth note. Those are two different things that are written two different ways that mean two different things. If you want a shorter note, use a shorter note value. If you want a louder/softer note, use a dynamic mark.

(https://i.imgur.com/YqHujiU.png)

Below are the specific jobs for articulations.

Staccatissimo - a very light weight note with a lifted release (also described as detached from the next note).
Staccato - a light weight note with a slightly lifted release (also described as detached from the next note).
Tenuto - a defined start, weighted note with no lift, touches the following note or rest.
Accent - a firm start, heavy weighted note with no lift, touches the following note or rest.
Marcato - a very hard start, heavier weight than an accent, sometimes played with a slightly lifted release.

The above information pertains to these symbols' origins in classical, or more "legit" playing styles, and should be consulted first when choosing appropriate markings for your music.

HOWEVER

In Jazz styles these symbols have a different set of meanings that conflict with the above information. In jazz instrumentalists often imitate the human voice, and as such the articulation markings have been in a sense slightly redefined. In these styles they are as follows:

Staccatissimo - virtually nonexistent in jazz, but would mean really short.
Staccato - short.
Tenuto - long.
Accent - stressed with a firm start. Also often long.
Marcato - Three words: fat, hard, short. Often articulated as DAHT or BAHP.

While these definitions aren't completely true to their original meanings, they hold significance in these styles of music.
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Dekkadeci on January 04, 2019, 04:00:31 PM
Your staccatissimo and marcato markings look like each other except flipped, which is confusing when the marcato marking actually looks like a V and the staccatissimo marking is filled in. I recommend getting actual pictures of the staccatissimo marking.
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Olimar12345 on January 04, 2019, 04:05:12 PM
Yeah, it was late and adding those was a last-minute addition. I could have probably found better characters to use if I had sifted through the alt-code characters, tbh. I will get pictures.
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Olimar12345 on January 04, 2019, 06:42:25 PM
Updated the OP
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Dekkadeci on January 05, 2019, 01:44:10 AM
The picture definitely looks better. Thanks!
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Static on January 06, 2019, 03:16:16 AM
It might be helpful to explain the uses for different articulation combinations, like portato, accent+tenuto, or accent+staccato vs. marcato, etc.
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Olimar12345 on January 06, 2019, 07:10:01 AM
I could add a section on that too. (Perhaps tomorrow)
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: JDMEK5 on January 06, 2019, 06:35:00 PM
This looks like a good place to discuss articulations of other instruments as well (encountered in arranging and transcribing to piano) such as guitar slides and how to understand/transcribe them (adapting of course to the piano as a different instrument). Also, maybe this is where we finally argue the heck out of the "always slur on grace notes" thing XD
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Olimar12345 on January 06, 2019, 09:04:08 PM
This looks like a good place to discuss articulations of other instruments as well (encountered in arranging and transcribing to piano) such as guitar slides and how to understand/transcribe them (adapting of course to the piano as a different instrument).

I disagree, as those kinds of effects aren't really articulations, and one of my goals here was to make this more of a concise thing. But that topic does have merit and should definitely be done possibly in a guide on specialized effects.

Also, maybe this is where we finally argue the heck out of the "always slur on grace notes" thing XD

What's this/who's saying this?
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: JDMEK5 on January 08, 2019, 12:09:26 AM
I disagree, as those kinds of effects aren't really articulations, and one of my goals here was to make this more of a concise thing. But that topic does have merit and should definitely be done possibly in a guide on specialized effects.
Makes sense to me. Perhaps I'll throw that together in the near future as its own thing.

What's this/who's saying this?
I could've sworn you did. Unless I'm totally wrong in that in which case never mind (though it was mostly a joke anyways). Specifically, the case being made was that all grace notes should be slurred to the note they relate to because of their nature (if I recall correctly). I disagree, but again, I was mostly joking. It's more of a debate topic rather than something for a guide.
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: Olimar12345 on January 08, 2019, 06:20:08 AM
That’s not something I’ve said or have ever believed, but perhaps there was a miscommunication somewhere along the way.
Title: Re: Information Regarding Different Types of Articulations
Post by: JDMEK5 on January 08, 2019, 06:34:11 AM
Eh, I probably attributed it wrongly. My bad.